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League Cycling Instructors: Why, and Who in Monterey County?

As increasing numbers of people bike (yay!), it’s even more important to get the word out about resources such as League of American Bicyclists (“Bike League”) League Cycling Instructors (LCIs). Share the short link to this post: https://bit.ly/MontereyLCIs.

Visitors from Holland bicycling on Alvarado Street in downtown Monterey. At the end of this post, see a photo gallery of some of the many people bicycling the roads of Monterey County. 

Linked text in this post leads to other posts on the Bicycling Monterey website unless otherwise indicated (i.e., unless link is displayed and includes bikeleague.org URL).

Why are League Cycling Instructors needed? 

LCIs help people learn riding skills, safety, and bike laws, including by hands-on / on-the-bike instruction. From educating less experienced riders about topics such as regulations and risks of sidewalk riding to boosting the confidence of experienced riders who want to update or refresh their knowledge, instruction from an LCI can help improve safety and comfort with biking.

Can’t take a class yet? Refer to section 4 of Bicycling Monterey’s “Bicycle Riding Skills, Bike Safety, and CA Bicycle Laws—for Children, Teens, and Adults” for info about League videos and the League booklets that we often distribute in our direct outreach by bike.

Some classes taught by LCIs are for teens and adults, including perennials. Others are for children, such as “Bicycling Skills 123.”

LCIs are certified to teach the League’s Smart Cycling curriculum, which includes Smart Cycling (formerly called Traffic Skills 101), Group Riding, Commuting, Bicycling 123 Youth, Bicycling 123, Safe Routes to School. (For any updates, refer to the FAQ “What can I do with my League Cycling Instructor Certification?” on https://bikeleague.org/content/become-instructor.) Learn more at https://www.bikeleague.org/content/find-take-class.

LCIs teach younger children in off-street settings, such as on school playgrounds.Most people agree that children up to approximately age 13 (some say 9-13) cannot really make the necessary decisions about vehicle speed and distance that allow them to bike safely in the street. (Tip: Learn about sidewalk riding pros and cons, and advocate for bike-friendly local ordinances.)

How do you get League Cycling Instructor (LCI) certification?
Bicycling Monterey is aware of five local LCIs.

Monterey County residents

who have LCI certification include:

  1. Frank Henderson, LCI #1432, since 2005
  2. Glenn Tozier, LCI #4063, since 2013
  3. Bernard Green, LCI #4064, since 2013
  4. Geoff Arnold, LCI# 5437, since 2016
  5. Chandra Rapley, LCI #5763, since 2017
To learn more about each one, including how to contact them, refer to section 9b of Bicycling Monterey’s DIRECTORY: Monterey County Bicycling Resources / Bike Community Leaders.
  • Longest-serving local LCI: Special thanks to LCI Frank Henderson for his faithful volunteerism at the Monterey County Probation Department Youth Center. The Youth Center’s bike ed program begins its 8th year in April 2019.
  • Newest local LCI: Scroll down for a special announcement about Chandra Rapley.

Below, LCI Frank Henderson adjusting traffic cones that had been provided for a bike skills course at Seaside City Hall during the Seaside PAL Bike Fair in 2012; Frank prefers chalk marks.

Newest LCI: Distinguished Young Woman in Traffic Injury Prevention 

The newest local LCI, Prunedale resident Chandra Rapley, was certified in 2017 in Bakersfield. She is bilingual English/Spanish and is a graduate of UC-Santa Cruz. Chandra is employed by Ecology Action of Santa Cruz, which does contract work for Transportation Agency for Monterey County, e.g., some Bike Month services, and bicycle safety trainings / bike rodeos at Monterey County schools. Her work for Ecology Action includes being lead youth educator.

Chandra writes:“I teach bike safety because I believe bicycling can be incredibly empowering for youth, helping them become more independent and explore their community in a new way. I also teach many 5th graders how to ride for the first time, and seeing them overcome their fears and realize that they can ride a bike is a beautiful moment.”

In 2019 Chandra was named Distinguished Young Woman in Traffic Injury Prevention by the National Association of Women Highway Safety Leaders: March 2019 newsletter –  NAWHSL. Congratulations, Chandra!

* * *

Some of the many people

biking roads of Monterey County

Bike-to-school commuter enjoying improved infrastructure on East Market Street in the Monterey County seat and its largest city, Salinas.

Eric Okerblom memorial riders in the Alisal / East Salinas, a culturally rich area of Salinas.

Touring cyclists on Highway 1, Big Sur.

Children learning their first bike skills, under their mother’s vigilant eye, on an early morning biking Carmel-by-the-Sea.

A local bike commuter on Highway 1, Moss Landing.

Bike-to-work commuter in Greenfield.

Visitor bicycling on 17-Mile Drive, Pebble Beach.

Bike-your-faith commuters in Seaside.

Local bike commuter navigating rush hour on Highway 218 / Canyon Del Rey Blvd at the Fremont Street intersection.

Dad teaching his daughter riding skills on Garden Road, Monterey—including such tips as watching out for big trucks.

One of the many military personnel stationed in Monterey County who bike commute regularly. For more, see “Military role models show: Unnecessary use of fossil fuels is fuelish!

Biking in the dark requires special considerations, as do inclement weather conditions

Yes, Bike League LCIs typically address in their instruction such topics as high visibility accessories and more.

The League of American Bicyclists recommends, in their “How to commute by bike” section’s safety tips [ https://www.bikeleague.org/content/commuting ] : “Be visible and predictable at all times: wear bright clothing, signal and follow the law.”

Disclaimer

No claim is made or liability accepted
for use of this website.
Bicycling Monterey is a local partner of the California Bicycle Coalition. For ten years, the founder’s work on this website and on all other Bicycling Monterey projects has been done as an unpaid volunteer.To recognize this decade of work with a one-time or automatic monthly contribution, see ways to give and FAQs.

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