8. REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE for Bikes and Bikeways, Including DIY

Return to Tips for Bicycling Monterey County portal page.

Make a contribution.

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This section includes…

  • reporting the need for repair and maintenance of bikeways
  • bicycle maintenance and repair services in Monterey County
  • do-it-yourself (DIY) bike maintenance and repair—wherever you live—plus some Monterey County repair/maintenance classes

Repair and Maintenance

of Bikeways

See a bikeway / public road condition needing attention? Please report it. It’s one of the easiest ways to advocate for bicycling.
What to report? Such things as potholes, debris on shoulders or bikeways, bikeways not clearly marked, damaged or missing bikeway signs, traffic signal not triggered by bicycles (no bike detection), vegetation overgrowth, construction obstacles, and other conditions interfering with safe and efficient travel by bike.
Where to report it:
(1) For state highways anywhere in California, you may report a pothole or other maintenance need directly to the California Department of Transportation / Caltrans: https://msr.dot.ca.gov.
(2) In Monterey County, for other public roads and all other public bikeways (e.g., bike/multi-use paths) in the county, you may report the need to Transportation Agency for Monterey County and they will contact the appropriate local agency on your behalf. See TAMC’s Bike Service Request Form AKA Bicycle Facilities Service Request (click here).
Would you prefer to contact local agencies directly? See “Bicycle infrastructure” in Bicycling Monterey’s directory of Monterey County’s biking resources for a few contacts, e.g., Monterey County Public Works.
In some cases, you may need to make more than one report (“the squeaky wheel gets the grease”).

For example, bike commuters who pedal to a local church hadn’t received a response to their request for sweeping debris from bike lanes—gravel left in the bike lane after work on that road. Asking friends to make reports too may help get the attention of busy transportation and public works staff in your local area.

(3) All other locations: For public roads and bikeways in other locations, you might start by contacting your county’s public works department or transportation agency/commission, or your local cities’ traffic engineering and planning departments. If necessary, contact your county supervisor or other local elected official.

Bicycle Maintenance

and Repair Services

Has your bike been gathering dust?

If you aren’t mechanically inclined, take it to a local bike shop for a safety inspection and tune-up!

Bicycle Boo-Boo?

If you need bicycle repairs or maintenance in Monterey County, even on a Sunday, you’re in luck. Seven days a week, nearly all have mechanics available. Do call first if you need major service on a Sunday. And call ahead on holidays, to be sure they aren’t taking the day off.

Have a “silly” question?

Perhaps you feel hesitant to ask questions at a bike shop. Don’t be! The best of local bike shops have employees who realize their work makes a very positive difference in the health of people and the planet. They take pride in their jobs and are glad to answer questions. If you don’t find that the case with a bike shop in this county or elsewhere, let the shop owner know. If that doesn’t get better results, try another shop next time.

Monterey County bicycle maintenance and repair services

  1. Carmel Carmel Bicycle in Carmel Rancho II.
  2. Marina –  Rooster Wheels & Coffee in Marina.
  3. Monterey – Just off freeway near NPS:   Peninsula Bike Works.
  4. Monterey – Downtown / Old Monterey:  Work Horse Bicycles
  5. Monterey – Cannery Row: Bay Bikes.
  6. Pacific Grove: Repair service Tues-Sat (closed Sun-Mon) at Winning Wheels, 318 Grand Avenue, Pacific Grove; phone 831/375-4322 (no web site at present).
  7. Salinas – North Salinas:   Bear Bikes(Note that Bear’s hours are Sun, 11-5, Mon-Sat, 10-6; a past AT&T yellow page ad had an error indicating they close at 8 pm.)
  8. Salinas – Downtown/Oldtown vicinityValley Bikes.
  9. Salinas – Downtown/Oldtown vicinity: Bobcat Bicycles.
  10. Seaside: If you’re biking on the path near Roberts Lake (see “Where to Bike”), the closest repair shop with mechanics available is Sports Center Bicycles on Del Monte Blvd.  
  11. Seaside: CSUMB Otter Cycle Center. Full-service repair shop at discounted rates for students, faculty, and staff only.
Also see the specialty services section of Bicycle Shops, Services, Clubs, and Resources in Monterey County, which includes experts such as Joseph Crabtree of Forest Hill Bike Shop in Pacific Grove. Joseph provides custom bikes and service, including pro builds for road, mountain, and cyclocross.

Joseph Crabtree, giving full attention to the exacting requirements for this bike.

Mobile mechanic needed?

Longtime local mechanics Robert Cepeda and Tony Ortiz have a mobile repair service, Bicycle Doctors. Tony is fluently bilingual (Spanish-English).

Bicycle Doctors biz card

Bay Bikes of Carmel and Monterey are often able to provide mobile mechanic service on request. Just ask!Mobile repair Bay Bikes

We’ve witnessed how that mobile mechanic service from our excellent local bike shops can work! How’s that? Both Bay Bikes and Sports Center Bicycles have served as the complimentary mobile mechanics at the annual Intergenerational Rides celebrating Monterey County Bike Month. We love how our local bike shops team up and pitch in to help with bike community events!

Robert Cepeda, service manager at Sports Center Bicycles of Seaside

provided complimentary mobile bike mechanic services

at the first Intergenerational Ride.

Below, at far right, Chris Paruolo worked for Bay Bikes when he served as mobile mechanic on the 2nd Annual Intergenerational Ride.

Last in from Custom House Plaza - 5-11-13

For a peek inside the service areas of some Monterey County bike shops, see the Bike Month celebration post, “$10 at Bike Shops Goes a Long Way.”

Do-It-Yourself

Maintenance and Repair

Like to do it yourself–at least a little? Many DIY folks find the bicycle parts illustrations linked on Bicycling Monterey’s “Other languages” page helpful.

Shifting Power: Bike Mechanics Training Videos / Cambiando Poder: Vídeos de Capacitacíon de Mecánica de Bicicletas, available free from Bikes Not Bombs at https://bikesnotbombs.org/shifting-power. Their video instruction series was created in 2015, and Bikes Not Bombs also makes available free their earlier instructional manual.

“Didn’t have my bike pump today, and there’s no bike shop nearby. Glad I can make use of the air at this gas station, so I can get my neighbor’s bike rolling for them.”

Air at the gas station

 

How to change a flat

Safe Cyclist Teacher Master Pages from Bike Texas include a range of great resources in Spanish and English, including “How to fix a flat” – “Cómo Arreglar una Ponchadurato.”

Here’s a video on how to change a flat by local Devian Gilbert, 2011 Golden Helmet Award winner and owner of Asana Cycles.

Here are three more videos, shared by Cath Tendler-Valencia.

Performance

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vn29DvMITu4

Get Dirty
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2yoy8ExiGE
Le Velo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jn0FF1KwL4I
Take a class?

Bike maintenance/repair classes are sometimes offered through the City of Monterey Parks and Rec, with teachers including excellent mechanics from Winning Wheels, a locally owned bike store in Pacific Grove for over 25 years. Click here to learn more.

Maintenance/repair classes have also been offered by REI Marina,  such as Basic Bike Maintenance (lube a chain, fix a flat, make minor adjustments) by REI certified bike tech Jared Lopez.  Call 831.883.8048 to inquire, or click here.

Micah, a veteran of the highly respected Joselyns, now closed.

But Micah is back. On 9/1/12, he and Sean Rigmaiden opened Peninsula Bike Works.


You may also be curious about these tips for washing your bike.
Do-it-yourself bike maintenance stations
  • First in Monterey County was at Salinas High School (established 8/27/12, for any SHS students). Click here for announcement. Questions? Contact Jim Warwick, 831-262-4152.
  • Second in the county was at California State University Monterey Bay / CSUMB (as of 8/29/12, pending installation). Two DIY stations will become part of CSUMB’s  Wise Biker resources (http://transportation.csumb.edu/biking).  Contact CSUMB with any questions.
  • More followed, including thanks to the Transportation Agency for Monterey County’s free bike repair stations. Learn more about that.
Homeless outreach
Husband-and-wife team Michael Fechter and Tia Sukin help the homeless in a variety of ways. Among those is that (as of 8/11/14), on Saturdays, at Dennis the Mennis Park in the El Estero Park Complex, Monterey there is a “Bike Church” AKA “Pass the Word,” where a couple of mechanics help the homeless fix their bikes. Michael and Tia would like to expand to provide this service on Sundays too, from approximately 10-11 a.m.  on the benches next to the volleyball courts at Window on the Bay Park, Monterey. (Both parks are City of Monterey facilities; click here for directions.) To volunteer or learn more, contact Michael and Tia at 843-276-7655.

Update: See Dennis Taylor’s 12/20/14 Monterey County Herald story, “Monterey homeless-help group...” which includes info about Bill Weller’s bike mechanic services, provided to anyone in need at these “Pass the Word” gatherings; and that some bikes have also been gifted to those in need.

Elsewhere in the Monterey Bay region
Santa Cruz County resources include the Bike Church, Santa Cruz and the Bike Shack, Watsonville. (Bike Shack, in fact, is one of the many reasons Watsonville has the potential to be the next Bike City USA, as reported by Roseann Hernandez 6/21/13 in the Register-Pajaronian.) Watsonville Bike Shack Cooperative is at 555 Main Street (behind Ramos furniture), Watsonville; (831) 296-0326; no website at present, but find them at Watsonville Bike Shack Cooperative on Facebook.
Be inspired by our neighboring cities!

For my musings on bike repairs…

and a vision for roadside bicycle repair in the USA, as is happening elsewhere, see “Prepare Communities First, Then Link Them.”