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Who rides CA SR 218 / Canyon del Rey Boulevard — slated to be first segment of Fort Ord Recreational Trail and Greenway (FORTAG) Project?

Short link to this post: http://bit.ly/CAHwy218

This post is offered as a reply to a social media comment, and question, made by a longtime local resident in response to the Monterey County Weekly’s 1/31/19 article by David M. Schmalz, “State awards TAMC $10.3 million to build the first segment of FORTAG” http://www.montereycountyweekly.com/blogs/news_blog/state-awards-tamc-million-to-build-the-first-segment-of/article_5c8ebfaa-25a4-11e9-b457-4349ee37d08e.html.

As Schmalz reported, this segment of the Fort Ord Recreational Trail and Greenway “will travel parallel to Highway 218 (also called Canyon Del Rey Boulevard) in Del Rey Oaks.” The first response of that commenter on Schmalz’s article was, “Boo!!!! Waste of funds. Who rides this corridor? Nobody.”

It makes sense that could be many people’s first thought when reading Schmalz’s article. Below are thoughts from Bicycling Monterey’s founder, for your consideration.
First, some notes
  • Full disclosure: This post is shared as a public service. To date Bicycling Monterey has never received any money from the Transportation Agency for Monterey County (TAMC) or from any of its staff members or contractors, and has also never received any money from the California Transportation Commission, California Department of Transportation, the County of Monterey, any local cities, or the FORTAG designers. That’s right, Bicycling Monterey has never received any financial contributions from any of those organizations or individuals. In addition, Bicycling Monterey’s founder (a local business owner since 1981) has never done any paid work for any of those organizations or individuals. Again, the info in this post is simply provided as a public service.
  • With the exception of the first link above, which leads to the Weekly’s 1/31/19 article, all bit.ly or other links in this post lead to Bicycling Monterey’s own content, published on this website.
  • All Bicycling Monterey projects have been provided by the founder as an unpaid volunteer since 2009, and that’s still the case as 2019 begins. To learn more about Bicycling Monterey, click here.
Okay, now on with an answer to the question, “Who rides this corridor?”

 

“Who rides this corridor?”

About that segment of http://bit.ly/FORTAG, among those who bike Cyn Del Rey / Hwy 218 for transportation—including people who bike-and-ride to reach their destinations—are the following people, and many more.
Pictured above is lifelong Del Rey Oaks resident and bike-to-school commuter Dani (http://bit.ly/YouthBikeDani). Another DRO resident who bikes Hwy 218 is http://bit.ly/SusanRagsdaleCronin, and her children. Yet another biking family: bike-to-work (and bike-his-kids-to-their-destinations) commuter dad Tim; see him in heavy traffic at the Cyn del Rey and Fremont Street intersection in an opening scene of Bicycling Monterey’s “It’s a New Day” video. His spouse, Mindy, likewise bikes around the Monterey Peninsula with their children; see http://bit.ly/BikeMom. I’m also among those who bike Hwy 218 / Cyn Del Rey regularly, whether on my old bicycle, or an e-assist (see a Cyn Del Rey, Del Rey Oaks scene in http://bit.ly/eBikeSnob).

Susan and daughters

(Photo provided courtesy of Susan Ragsdale-Cronin)

Tim

Besides the local residents mentioned above, also biking this route are touring cyclists and other visitors, as well as more locals, who bike Hwy 218 as part of their route to places such as the Monterey Bay Sanctuary Scenic Trail, Fremont Street, General Jim Moore Road (with some of those even biking to WeatherTech Raceway)Highway 68 – Monterey-Salinas Highway, Olmsted Road, Jacks Peak (to bike paved roads, not trails), Aguajito Road, and numerous other destinations.

 Below, locals Janet and Jack on General Jim Moore Blvd, which connects to Hwy 218

Below, a Velo Club Monterey member at the Hwy 218 intersection on Hwy 68

As Dani wrote in her Bicycling Monterey guest post (http://bit.ly/YouthBikeDani): “It is sometimes intimidating riding where there aren’t bike paths, even in town, and it would be so much easier if there were more bike paths around Monterey County. I think that by improving our infrastructure—including more bike racks too—it would encourage more people to ride bikes. I frequently see cars drifting into bike lanes (class 2), and it would be much safer if we added more bike paths (class 1) and protected bike lanes (class 4), especially class 4 lanes with a physical barrier.”
Whether I bike or drive Highway 218, I’m often surprised by the people who walk, skateboard, or scoot alongside Hwy 218 as well. Some of those showed up at TAMC’s June 2018 workshop or otherwise offered input to TAMC about Hwy 218.
Many see the State of California’s allocation of funds for CA State Route 218 (Canyon Del Rey Boulevard) as an investment in reducing carbon emissions (http://bit.ly/ActOnClimateBike), traffic congestion, etc. by encouraging active transportation, along with boosting the many other benefits of bicycling, including benefits to the economy, public health, and more.
Comments on this post are welcome; please refer to comment policy. Phone calls are also welcome: http://bit.ly/ContactBikeMRY.

Bicycling Monterey’s founder has provided this website and all other Bicycling Monterey projects as an unpaid volunteer since 2009, and that’s still the case as 2019 begins. 

Consider helping with this work: contribute project supplies, volunteer time, or make a financial contribution to the Bicycling Monterey site and projects. (Why? See what people say.)

 

 

 

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